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Trainer vs. Rollers – How to Decide – Maghalie Rochette

Feedback Sports offers a variety of performance products to support your training and racing. We know every cyclist is different with varying needs and wants. Folks often reach out to ask us for our expertise and suggestions based on their individual situation. But why take our word for it when you can take that of an accomplished professional bike racer?

This blog comes from one of our supported athletes and Canadian Cyclocross National Champion, Maghalie Rochette. She addresses two age-old dilemmas: “outdoor elements vs. indoor training” and “trainer vs. rollers” and she does it with a clever 90’s rock reference.

Photo: Courtesy of Ten Speed Hero

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It’s no coincidence that Guns N’ Roses decided to name a song ‘November Rain’. November seems to bring a lot of rain, and more often than not it brings cold temperatures too.

As a cyclocross racer, weather is an element we have to take into consideration when planning the season’s training. It presents its own physical challenges and can certainly raise mental doubt too. Should I use that opportunity to go outside and practice my skills in the mud? Am I risking getting sick?  Can I do quality intensity work in sloppy and cold conditions or should I do that inside?

My experience is that there is no 100% right or wrong answers to those questions. Riding in the rain from time to time is essential to work on your skills for muddy cyclocross races and it can certainly boost your mental preparedness.

Some will say that riding in the rain builds character. But if you’re sick, no matter how much character you’ve got, how much good are you doing?

Riding outside in those conditions requires much more energy than doing the same training ride in good conditions, and that is not to be neglected…even Axel Rose said it: “It’s hard to hold a candle, in the cold November rain.” I’m pretty certain that when he wrote those lyrics, he meant it’s hard to keep the fire alive when riding in the cold November rain. All said, long rides in the wet and cold aren’t necessarily ideal.


It can be tempting to ride indoors when it’s cold and wet, but maintaining cyclocross skills for off-camber, loose terrain requires getting outside and practicing race scenarios. 
How do you keep your training effective without getting sick, without sacrificing your skills and without draining all your motivation?

Balance is the key! Personally, indoor cycling suits my interval training and short easy spins, and I save the outdoor riding for skills training and running workouts.  Intervals keep you engaged, which makes time pass quickly, even when riding inside. And for easy rides I like to watch a cyclocross race to “study” the racing – time well spent, no doubt.

When indoor training calls, trainer or rollers?  They both have their advantages and I use both in my cyclocross training. Below is a summary of my experience training and racing – I hope it helps you make the decision on which device fits your needs the best.


How to improve running for cyclocross? Run… When the weather turns sour, use that time to get outside and do the running that’s required come race day – it’s gonna happen, so be prepared.
Why I choose the Omnium Over-Drive Trainer

  • Small and compact: The foldable and compact design of the Omnium makes it very easy to travel with and carry around. (I usually travel with it as my carry-on item in the plane!)
  • Stability: The Omnium trainer is super stable. That allows me to easily pedal without hands and do high-intensity intervals without concentrating on balance.
  • Standing on the bike: Intervals can be done at maximum effort, even while standing, with full confidence that I’m supported and I don’t have to focus on anything but doing the work.
  • Progressive resistance: The harder I work, the more the trainer works against me, simple. If I go easy, it won’t put up a fight. That’s an awesome feature that allows me to do all-out intervals without running out of gears, but also allows me to spin easy when I need to recover. Having that progressive resistance is ideal for warm-up and cool-down efforts at the races.
  • Smooth and natural: The feeling of pedaling on the Omnium is smoother and more realistic than any other trainer I’ve ridden, but not quite as natural as when riding the rollers.

Why I choose the Zero-Drive Rollers

  • Natural, smooth feeling: As much as I enjoy the Omnium, rollers allow my bike to move like it does when I’m riding outside and there’s something nice about that. You can spin the legs quickly and easily and, in my opinion, time seems to pass a little quicker on rollers.
  • Balance/Skills: The natural movement on the rollers opens up opportunities to work on skills and balance even when riding inside. (For example: one leg pedaling, working on cadence, one hand, no hands, etc.)
  • Standing: You can stand up on the rollers, but you have to be careful. All-out standing sprints on rollers is a bit precarious. I’m typically standing only to change position for comfort.

*When riding rollers, having a bench or wall nearby can make getting on and off a lot easier and something you’ll appreciate if you’re                 new to the free-floating design.


Training is for building fitness and visualizing success – the opportunity to ride indoors on a trainer means your attention is free to explore pain, breathing techniques, and creating mental images of the win. 
At the end of the day, it’s all about finding what works best to maintain happiness, motivation, fitness and skills.

It also helps to have an outside opinion when making those decisions – someone who will be more rational and less emotional. I rely on my coach, David Gagnon, because I know he has the big picture in mind and that he’ll make the most educated decisions.

When it’s all set and done, crank out some Guns N Roses on your speakers and get pumped for those intervals – bring on the November Rain! I promise, you’ll have a good time 😉

 

Note: The Omnium trainer is also available as a resistance-free Zero-Drive Omnium complete trainer, or Zero-Drive sled add-on for your existing Omnium Overdrive – ideal for track cyclists, BMX, or an easier warm-up/cool-down at the races. 

 

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Three Tips to Enjoy and Leverage the Offseason – Chris Mayhew

~Originally posted Jan 24, 2017 – via Cyclocross Magazine /Chris Mayhew

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Coach Chris Mayhew heeded his own advice and took a brief break from cyclocross season’s efforts, but the author, racer and coach is back. Whether you raced 2017 Nationals, have road or mountain bike goals or just hope to improve on this past cyclocross season, coach Mayhew of JBV Coaching has some helpful tips to make the most of the offseason…

What should I be doing? It’s a question I’ve been getting almost every day from new clients, friends, and clients just coming off cyclocross season. Most of us are pretty driven and like to feel like we’re doing work every day so this time of year can feel discomforting. It’s a long way from next cyclocross season but sitting around isn’t something most of us are good at. I have three suggestions that will get you through the next couple of months till the weather breaks.

If you went to Nationals this year, congratulations. That was one for the books, no matter how your individual race went. If you did go, chill out for a month and don’t feel obligated to do anything but eat and relearn the names of your loved ones. Come back to this column in a month or so. It’ll be here.

Conditions varied in Hartford, but if you raced there, coach Mayhew says a break from training is unconditionally mandatory. photo: Snowy conditions greeted racers to start today's racing. 2017 Cyclocross National Championships, Masters Men 30-34. © A. Yee / Cyclocross Magazine

Conditions varied in Hartford, but if you raced there, coach Mayhew says a break from training is unconditionally mandatory. photo: Snowy conditions greeted racers to start today’s racing. 2017 Cyclocross National Championships, Masters Men 30-34. © A. Yee / Cyclocross Magazine

If you didn’t go to Nationals then you probably ended your season sometime in mid-December. What’s your next goal? Many people race only cyclocross, so they’re not competing until August or so. Some people race mountain bikes or road during the offseason and will be racing around April in colder climates, or sooner if you live in areas like California, Texas or Florida. If you’re planning on the latter, my first suggestion is to get on some sort of organized plan (created by you or a coach).

Plan out your offseason training and workouts to slowly build back fitness. photo: Justin See

Plan out your offseason training and workouts to slowly build back fitness. photo: Justin See

The journey from offseason to race shape takes three to four months and you’d do well to get started on that now. That’s particularly important if you plan to race on the road, which is not a lot of fun if you aren’t in razor sharp form, unlike mountain bike racing and cyclocross. Keep in mind the words “journey” and “fitness,” I want to circle back to those in a bit.

“If you did go, chill out for a month and don’t feel obligated to do anything but eat and relearn the names of your loved ones. Come back to this column in a month or so.”

If your main goals for the summer are simply to ride, have fun or do Jeremy Powers’ Grand FUNdo, you have a bit more time on your hands, which is nice. That means there’s less pressure on you to get into shape now when riding often means riding indoors or outside in less-than-desirable conditions. What should you be doing with that time? I’d encourage you to do two things:

One is to do things you haven’t done at all, or want to get back to. Cycling takes place all in one plane of movement and involves relatively few muscles. Anything you can do to develop strength in muscles long ignored (or never developed) is great. Plus, your training load is low right now and shouldn’t be focused on cycling, so you can do things that would normally leave you too tired for cycling. Start lifting weights, do CrossFit, go running, go swimming.

The offseason is a great time to try something new, like Crossfit, says coach Mayhew. photo: Artic Warrior / Justin Connaher

The offseason is a great time to try something new, like Crossfit, says coach Mayhew. photo: Artic Warrior / Justin Connaher

Get started on a yoga program or increase your practice by a few days a week. All of those things encourage strengthening and involve movements you’d never do in cycling, which are good things. Moreover, they let you check that box of “doing work” every day which is good for any athlete’s head while developing a sense of self outside of cycling. A lot of us can get depressed around this time because we’re not riding and that can be related to not getting your endorphin fix from exercise. So get moving in some form that’s not cycling.

Second, I realize that we do like to ride our bikes, and so if you are going to ride your bike, there’s one workout I’d encourage you to incorporate at least once a week: threshold training. The classic version of this workout is two efforts of twenty minutes each at lactate threshold, functional threshold power, or however you choose to anchor your intensity level schema or want to define fitness. If you don’t have an anchor, think about doing a steady time trial for 20-30 minutes and riding at that pace in that manner. (Pro tip: start the effort easier than you think you should and try to increase the effort a small bit every five minutes) I think 2×20 minutes is something to work up to. Start with smaller blocks, but no shorter than 8 minutes. Do 2×8 and add a few minutes to each block every week. When you get to 2×20 then you can think about adding intensity to the workout rather than minutes.

Trainer work isn't fun for many of us, but doing threshold work now will pay off later in the form of fitness, speed and results. © Cyclocross Magazine

Trainer work isn’t fun for many of us, but doing threshold work now will pay off later in the form of fitness, speed and results. © Cyclocross Magazine

This work is not that exciting and can be somewhat laborious. But it’s the flour to build your cake in the analogy for which I am so fond of using (see Hiring a Coach and Training for Gravel, Embracing Offseason Training and Turning Down Volume and Upping the Power for key steps to that recipe). It takes a long time to build threshold power, on the order of several months, so you’ll need to do a lot of these, which means you should get started now. This is a workout I think you should do 40 weeks out of the year, give or take.

The hard part about riding your bike right now is that you’re at the beginning of your journey back to regaining fitness you once enjoyed. And for weeks or months of doing threshold workouts, or any ride, you’re not going to be where you were. A lot of people tend to get really down about how fat or out of shape they feel during this time. What they’re doing is comparing where they are or “should be” to where they are right now. I would really encourage you to avoid that mindset. Focus on where you are now and embrace it. Spend your mental energy on figuring out what you can do today, to work towards your goal. No single workout will make or break your season. It’s a large body of work, over weeks and months, that matter.

Think about what you can do today and be happy with yourself when you do that thing. Do you get mad at yourself because you’re not on vacation right now and think poorly of yourself? Or do you figure out a plan of where and when you can go on vacation, look forward to that, and make sure you pack everything you want for that vacation? Look forward to the journey and doing the work. If you’re just looking for results, you won’t last long in this sport because those are far and few between. If you can learn to love the journey and take pleasure in it, you’ll ride your bike for as much of your life as you want to.

“Spend your mental energy on figuring out what you can do today, to work towards your goal. No single workout will make or break your season.”

I think actor/DJ Idris Elba has some good words here in that regard:

Lastly I’d tell you that even if you could get into August form tomorrow, somehow you’d spend all of February thinking you should be fitter or leaner. Learn to be happy where you are and learn to love making small steps to another place, day in and day out.

Have your best cyclocross season ever with all of our Training and Technique Tuesday pieces here from coaches Mayhew, Adam Myerson and Kenneth Lundgren and others. Can’t get enough? See our Cyclocross Academy and Cyclocross 101 articles here. Mayhew expects to contribute Training Tuesday installments every two weeks in the offseason. 

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The Importance of a Bike Fit

Originally posted Aug 1st, 2018 / Gear Tips
Courtesy of Team Holowesko|Citadel p/b Arapahoe Resources 

Team Holowesko/Citadel racer, TJ Eisenhart putting in the miles on the Omnium Over-Drive.

 

The average pro bike racer is in the saddle around 30 hours for a hard training week, about half that for an “easy week.” The Tour de France covers around 3500 km (2200 mi). If we’re talking about mere mortals: logging 10 to 15 hours a week in your cycling training plan would get you the respectable head-nod within your local racing scene.  Seven to 10 hours/week would keep you fit as a fiddle. But whether your weekly rides total three hours or 30, if your bike doesn’t fit you properly, you could be in for a world of pain.

A poor fit might start with something fairly innocuous like saddle sores, mild discomfort, or a weak pedal stroke, but it can quickly progress to knee and back injuries or worst of all … slower speeds and reduced power!  In short: there’s a long, negative list of very bad things that can easily be avoided with the right fit and accessories.

If you google “How to fit yourself on a bike,” you’ll get plenty of advice. Pages and pages of advice via step-by-step tutorials, videos, etc. But we suggest consulting a professional for several very basic, yet key reasons:

 EVERY ATHLETE IS DIFFERENT

One person’s femur length, hip flexion, arm-reach, core muscles, pelvis width, etc. is quite different than another’s. When things are out of whack (which can be hard to diagnose just by just looking down at your bike/body) your body will attempt to compensate and that’s when folks get injured.

A PROPER FIT ENSURES COMFORT

Comfort leads to enjoyment, which leads to more riding, which leads to puppies and butterflies (or puppies and cyclocross) and World peace.

A WELL-FIT BIKE IS A FAST BIKE

That’s right. If you’re not riding with an optimal fit, you’re likely sacrificing speed and power. Why would anyone ever want to do that?

BIKE PERSONALIZATION

A good fit might mean swapping out certain things like handlebars, saddle, stem, pedals, shoes, etc. This is referred to as “bike personalization” in Fit-Land. If you’ve been a cyclist for a while, you might have an arsenal of spare parts and accessories in your garage. But if not, not to worry! A professional bike fitter can make suggestions, swap out accessories, and make these adjustments for you, right at the shop or their studio so you can “try before you buy.”

There are many types of professional bike-fit methods out there. Some shops and studios may have elaborate in-house bike-fit systems, and others just use a traditional trainer in a quiet corner or a side-room of the shop. One trend we’re noticing is that the Feedback Sports Omnium Over-Drive Trainer is becoming a staple of professional fitters all around the world. Fitters have come to the conclusion that the same features of the Omnium that appeal to pro and amatuer cyclists make it the perfect bike-fit tool as well.

  • Simple fork-mount design: This allows for quick and easy set-up. Ask any racer (or rather a pro-racer’s mechanic) and they’ll tell you just how fast and easy they are. No fiddling with your rear cassette, no need for a trainer-wheel vs. a racing or riding wheel, no derailleur adjustments, etc.

  • Compatibility: The Omnium Over-Drive accommodates Road, MTB, CX, TT, BMX and even Folding Bikes as it accepts QR, 12×100, 15×100, 15×110 (Boost) Thru axles.*

  • Lightweight and portable: At under 14 pounds, the Omnium Over-Drive folds up easily and comes with its own tote-bag. If you’re an athlete, this means hassle-free travel to the races. But its compact nature also makes it perfect for small spaces at home. These same features allow a shop or studio to maximize precious space, and even allow the fitter to take it with them if they wish to fit a client in the comfort of their own home or on the road.

  • Internal Progressive Resistance: Just because it’s small and compact doesn’t mean it doesn’t pack a powerful punch. The Omnium Over-Drive’s magnetic resistance is hiding in its two round, aluminum drums. The faster you pedal, the more resistance you’ll feel. But instead of the loud sounds of a wind or fluid trainer, it’s quiet. For athletes, you can hit this trainer with your hardest workouts. If you’re at the races, it’s perfect for warming up or spinning for a cool-down. A fitter will appreciate being able to talk to their client rather than having to yell over the trainer, and she or he will be able to watch your pedal stroke on the spectrum of an easy, relaxed pace, as well as standing up and hammering.

TESTIMONIALS:

“As a professional bike fitter, The Omnium Over-Drive Trainer has been the most versatile and adaptable trainer on the market. With the advancement of through axles, having the ability to use one trainer with different spacing options for all wheel sizes and axle widths has freed me up to focus on fitting. It is an indispensable tool of the trade.”

-George Mullen, Professional Bike Fitter, Peak Cycles, Golden, CO

“Traveling with a team’s worth of equipment is always a challenge. Trying to figure out how to get trainers anywhere used to be one of my least favorite tasks. The Omnium has really been a game changer for us. Light enough to fly with, quiet enough to use in a hotel room, and compact enough to pack out of the way until they are needed. Plus with the massive range of compatibility, you can always lend one out if another team is in need.”

-Doug Sumi, Chief Mechanic, Holowesko|Citadel p/b Arapahoe Resources

Chances are you’ll see more of the Omnium Over-Drive in the near future. Look for it in the overhead of an airplane, on the balcony of a hotel, at pro or local races, and of course…at your local bike shop in the hands of a professional bike fitter. For more information about the Omnium Over-Drive, please click here!

*Additional adapters for Lefties and QRx74mm can be purchased separately if needed. 

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Want to be a better cyclocross racer? Avoid the avoidable, says coach Chris Mayhew.

With the upcoming United States Cyclocross National Championships , we invited JBV Coaching’s Chris Mayhew to share his thoughts on how to prepare for the big race at hand. Mayhew has actively raced for over 25 years – toeing the line at elite cyclocross, road, MTB and time trial events.  He puts on cycling training camps, cycling skills clinics, and rumor has it, he’s also quite the bike mechanic. In other words, Chris lives and dies for cyclocross and has the experience to know what makes a bike racer successful.  Anyone prepping for that “big race” has trained their body to be ready. Chris’s tips can ensure your bike is ready, too.
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You’ve spent months training and analyzing your data, hours researching the right hashtags and filters for your #crossiscoming posts and then on race day all that hard work comes undone from a preventable mechanical. Bummer.

Ben Bergeron says there are 5 things you can control as a racer: sleep, recovery, nutrition, training and mindset. I would add that for bike racing you can also control the initial state of your equipment. That said, I realize it’s challenging to put in the work as a bike racer and then have to be a bike mechanic too. My experience has proven there are two really easy ways to provide the best return on your time and keep your equipment in for cyclocross season.

First, wash your bike.

Bill Marshall (KCCX) getting the job done in fine fashion.

This can take many forms, and it’s somewhat situational dependent. After a muddy ride or race, the minimum you should do is lean the bike up against something and hit it with a hose to knock the majority of the mud off. This will keep your sidewalls and any metal parts on the bike happy along with the cables, if you still have any of those! Spend two minutes on this.

It doesn’t need to be perfect, it needs to be clean enough to lube a chain and see the details of the drivetrain components. The real action happens with a deeper wash, which should happen once a week. Remove the wheels, install a chain keeper, and put the bike in a repair stand. I prefer dropout-style repair stands for washing and detailed work, but also have the luxury of a standard upright repair stand too. Get a bucket, some brushes and some Dawn soap and go to town. This isn’t about being a black shoe, white sock roadie. Think of this as an active meditation with your bike. Clean all the surfaces, making sure some sort of cleaner (soap for the bike, de-greaser for the chain) gets liberally applied and washed off. As you do this, have a close look at the frame and all the moving, rotating and gliding components. Spin the cranks while you clean them and feel for looseness or crunchiness in the bearings (bottom bracket, pedal and derailleur). Think about any issues you had with the bike when you last rode it – the minute I dismount my bike, I seem to forget any problem I had until the next time I ride.

This whole bike wash process should take around 15-20 minutes from the time you fill the bucket until you put the bike back in storage. The main point in all of this is to engage with every part of the bike and catch things like bent chain links or worn cables before they become a problem on race day. This is a great time to quickly check your brake pads too.

So yes, you get a clean bike out of it, but more importantly it’s a bike inspection and preventative maintenance.

In tandem with the above, and maybe even while you still have it in the stand, check your bolts.

You don’t have to do this every week, but once a month run through the stem, seat-post and saddle bolts at minimum. I’m in love with my Feedback Sports Range for this sort of work. You can loosen and tighten any bolt with it (unlike most torque wrenches) and it comes in a very handy little case that keeps all the bits in one place. All my other torque bits are scattered somewhere across my work bench at this point. I’ve taken to just keeping my Range in my race clothing bag as a race day essential.

As I said earlier, bike maintenance is definitely something you can control – it’s called “preventative maintenance” for a reason, and it’s a great use of your time – I’ve witnessed too many races undone by the avoidable. And as with any task, the right tool makes it easier and faster to do, which means you’re more likely to do it.

Racing bikes is hard work, on and off the field. Don’t let all your hours of training and preparation come undone by one loose bolt. Spend some time owning the state of your equipment. Get it clean enough to notice any small issues before they become a race day nightmare. Run through the bolts periodically to make sure nothing is loose and don’t forget the bolts in your shoes. If you want to make all of the above easier  to perform there are some Feedback Sports items that would be worth putting on your wish-list.

Good luck at your races, and remember: you can often make your own luck.

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Thanks for the words of wisdom, Chris! Follow Chris on IG, Facebook and Twitter for more. You can also catch his articles on Cyclocross Magazine. 

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Race-Day Warm-up with Amanda Nauman

Though we all know that warm-legs are fast legs… it’s can be hard to know where to begin. You might wonder, “Should I use a bike trainer or rollers?” How hard should I go before a race?”, “For how long?”, “Should I do intervals?”, “Why is my skinsuit so tight?”, “Is my number pinned properly?”.  While we can’t really help you with the last two questions, we did find some experts to share what works for them in terms of the first four.

We asked our friends, David Sheek (Carmichael Training Systems Coach) and Amanda Nauman (known to friends and the cycling community as “Amanda Panda”) of Team SDG – Muscle Monster for some general preparation tips and a warm-up plan to help anyone maximize their race-day potential.

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~From Amanda and Dave~

Our friends at Feedback Sports have really stepped up the game with a solid range of traveling goodies that are also amazing products to have in any garage. Whether traveling to Europe or chasing events around the United States, Feedback has made it easier to be prepared at home and on the road. A few of our favorites are the Team Edition Tool Kit, Omnium Portable Trainer, and Sprint Work Stand which all fit into the bottom of our cases for travel.

Being Prepared: Pre-Event Warm-up

A pre-event warm-up is designed to increase muscle core temperature, start the body’s cooling processes, and activate energy systems. Here’s a step-by-step guide to activating your body for a great performance using the Feedback Sports Omnium Portable Trainer.

Warm-up

It’s pretty common for a warm-up routine to be 45-60 minutes. You need to spend some time at lactate threshold and throw in a few high-intensity efforts to activate the processes related to producing and processing lactate, but you want to do as little as possible to achieve those goals. A generic warm-up includes 15-25 minutes of spinning, 5-10 minutes at LT, and two 1-2 minute VO2 max efforts. Variations of that will typically get the job done. A long warm-up is likely to generate more heat so weather and other variables are taken into consideration.

The nature of your event also plays a role in your warm-up. If your event is going to start out relatively slow, like a road race, then you can minimize the warm-up activities. If the event is going to start hard, like a cyclocross race, then it’s important to activate your energy systems and lactate processing systems.

Variations on the Weather

There is a fine line between activating your body for a great performance and hurting your performance through overheating in your warm-up. After warming up some higher energy systems, your muscle temperature and core temperature are elevated and primed to race. In warmer temperatures it is recommended to cool down for about 10 minutes before going to the start line to avoid any chances of overheating. In cooler temperatures it is recommended to add clothing layers and maintain that elevated core temperature en route to the start line.

Go to the Start Line

If you’re going to be standing on the start line for a long time before you start, as is often the case with cyclocross races, you’re going to be standing still. In this scenario, try to go to the line wearing enough clothing or layers to stay warm. Plan to hand your clothing off to someone with a few minutes to the whistle.

The focus on staying warm during and after a riders’ warm-up routine pays off because you will be ready for action right from the start. Keeping your core temperature at an optimal level enables you to start faster, get to the front of the race, and stay there.

Taking the proper steps to activate all your energy systems through a proper warm-up, all starts with the right trainer routine. It’s difficult to find an event that allows for sufficient open road to correctly hit the warm-up zones that your preparation requires. Traveling with the Feedback Sports Omnium Over-Drive guarantees the freedom to create and execute a routine around an ideal warm-up that will set you up physically and mentally for success.

Time CTS Zone Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) 10-Point Scale
10 min Endurance Miles (EM) 4-5
2 min Tempo 6
2 min EM 4-5
2 min Tempo 6
2 min EM 4-5
2 min Steady State (SS) 7-8
2 min EM 4-5
2 min SS 7-8
2 min EM 4-5
1 min Climbing Repeat (CR) 8
2 min EM 4-5
30 sec Power Interval (PI) 9
2 min EM 4-5
30 sec PI 9
5-10min EM 4-5
Off Trainer – Head to Startline
10 min Active Cooling 2-4

*Amanda is currently rocking the cyclocross and gravel scene. She and David clearly know a thing or two about race-day preparation. Thanks for the tips, David and Amanda!  We’ll see you (and your Feedback Sports Race Day Essentials) at the Cyclocross Nationals in Kentucky! #pandapower

Big Ring Cycles Grand Re-Opening

Who

Since 1999 Big Ring Cycles has been one of Golden Colorado’s premier high end bike shops that caters to all cyclists. Whether you’re a hardcore roadie, commuter, or only let your tires touch dirt Big Ring has what you need. Their mission statement reads: “At Big Ring Cycles, we are passionate about one thing: the bicycle. We believe that the world would be a better, more cheerful place if more people rode bicycles more often. We’re about the wind in your face, and the sun on your back. We’re about tan lines, the kind that never disappear. We’re about long climbs, followed by fast descents. We’re about commuting, recreating, and of course, racing. We’re about tradition. We’re about passion. And we’re about community. We are Big Ring Cycles, and we’re here to change the world, one bike at a time.”

What

After purchasing the business in 2016, owner Seth Wolins decided it was time for some changes. Over the course of the winter they have been working to overhaul their space to make it bigger and better than ever in order to serve more customers more effectively. After months of hard work they are ready to share it with you! So come one. come all bicycle lovers to the Grand Re-Opening of Big Ring Cycles of Golden, Colorado.

When and Where

Big Ring has huge weekend planned, jam packed with events, sales, group rides and more.

Re-Opening weekend starts Thursday Night, May 17th, with the Kick off Ride which is part of their weekly shop rides including the added benefit of a post ride beer celebration to really start the weekend right. Riders are invited to have a beer or 2 next door at Barrels and Bottles post ride. First round is on us (Big Ring)!

If group rides aren’t your thing swing by Friday night, May 18th, for the BIG PARTY! It is time to unwind, celebrate making it through a few crazy months and thank the Big Ring Family for the support! Smokey J’s BBQ will be on hand serving up delicious food and drinks will be provided. There will be a blind taste testing of the Big Ring Cocktail finalists and the winner will be announced that night!

Moving into Saturday, May 19th, vendors will be on site to answer your questions demonstrate products and keep the good vibes going. So swing by our tent and check out our repair stands, trainers, tools, or any of our race day essentials. Hours are 9am-6pm and the grill will be going from 12 noon to 2pm.

The big weekend caps off Sunday morning with group mountain bike AND road rides leaving from the shop at 8am followed by coffee and breakfast to prepare for the final day of great deals. Hours are 10am-4pm featuring a Trek E-Bike Demo from 10am-2pm.

If you love Colorado cycling, you don’t want to miss this, so come on out and support your local bike shop and enjoy some great events. For updates check out Big Ring Cycles website, as well as connect with them on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Hope to see you out there!

Happy Trails from Feedback Sports

Sea Otter Classic

Who

Sea Otters…….just kidding, us, Feedback Sports, along with thousands of spectators, athletes, exhibitors, and bicycle enthusiasts of all kinds!

What

“You guys should put on a mountain bike race.”

That simple statement from a Monterey bike shop owner in 1990 was the genesis for the Sea Otter Classic.

Co-founders Frank Yohannan and Lou Rudolph hosted the inaugural Laguna Seca Challenge on April 6 & 7, 1991. There was a total of 350 athletes and 150 spectators. Today the event hosts over 9,600 athletes and 72,500 fans. In 1993 the event was renamed the Sea Otter Classic and is now universally regarded as the world’s premier cycling festival.

Known as a sprawling and energetic “celebration of cycling,” Sea Otter is cycling’s North American season opener. Professional and amateur athletes alike make the annual pilgrimage to Sea Otter to participate in some of the sport’s most competitive and enduring events. Hundreds of pro cyclists, including national, world, and Olympic champions, attend Sea Otter to race and meet with fans.

Most of cycling’s racing disciplines are represented including mountain bike cross country, downhill, dual slalom, and short track racing. Road cyclists compete in circuit, criterium, and road racing. Also offered are cyclocross and a number of non-competitive recreational events for riders of all ages.

The Sea Otter Classic also hosts the world’s largest consumer bike exposition in North America. The Expo holds hundreds of vendors who display new products, distribute free samples, and offer great bargains. The four-day, action-packed festival includes an international food court, entertainment, bike demos, stunt shows, and activities for children.

The Sea Otter Classic is located in Monterey County, one of the most popular tourist destinations in the world.

When

April 19-22

Where

Monterey, California

Why

To celebrate the wonderful things that are cycling. This will be Feedback Sports’ 8th visit to the exciting celebration of cycling that is the Sea Otter Classic. So swing by booth 112/113 and check out our race day essentials, trainers, tools, storage solutionsrepair stands, as well as our store displays. We’ll also have some new apparel on display only for Sea Otter so get there while the getting is good.

 

For a complete schedule of events click here.

For more information on events, exhibit, cost, etc click here.

 

Mechanics National Championships (Reno)

We all know our bikes would be useless without proper maintenance. Some of us do this ourselves, while others happily pass it off to the brave, knowledgeable souls to maintain them (for us). Join us for this wildly fun annual event showcasing these unsung heroes.  The Mechanics National Championships will test mettle of the mechanics and highlight their skills.  Entertaining (to say the least), this event is often highlight of Cyclocross Nationals week!  Taking place at El Jefe’s in the Silver Legacy Hotel Casino, drinks and food will be available all night.

Sponsored by:

Reno Cx Nats-Women’s Forum (at Patagonia)

Ladies, if you’re going to be in Reno for Cx Nats, this event is for you!

 

The women’s forum is a chance to participate in a discussion on cyclocross and cycling…with plenty of fun!  From diverse background all related to cycling, our panelists are sure to provide insight to the life and rigors of the smiles we get from riding.  Sponsored by Patagonia, Feedback Sports and Sierra Nevada, the proceeds from the event will go to the Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship.

Moderator:  Bill Schieken of www.cxhairs.com

Panelists:

We’ll see you there, ladies! 

Reno 2018 Cyclocross Nationals

The 2018 Reno Cyclocross National Championships are almost here!  Will we see you there? We certainly hope so.  For the gazillionth year in a row, Feedback Sports will be racing, wrenching, pitting and cheering our faces off at Cyclocross Nationals. We’ll have 2 – 10×10 tents, plenty of Omniums to warm-up on, tools to play with and some of our new shirts/hats for sale. We’re calling it “The Official Unofficial Warm-up Tent”. 

Well also be at the Women’s Night and The Mechanic’s Challenge. If you’re going, please come and introduce yourself! We love making new friends. New friends who love bikes is even better.

Click here for the full racing schedule.

Seriously.  Don’t stand out there in the cold.  Come say “hello!”.

No. Just…no.