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Committed to Racing

cyclist racing

It’s in our name. It’s defines our company culture. And it’s the recipe for how our products have earned the reputation of durable and portable. It’s our commitment to racing.

We put our products in the hands of the World’s most demanding teams, athletes and mechanics. Grand Tours, Spring Classics, World Cup MTB and Cyclocross are all opportunities for us to gain Feedback, so our products satisfy the people who use them at home, the local and regional races, and Nationals events.

Our commitment to racing is no more obvious than walking the pits of this past weekends Trek Cup World Cup Cyclocross Race in Waterloo, WI. We started counting Omniums, but at a certain point the number just became “a lot”…

Have a look at a few pics from the weekend – as always, Trek’s dedication to cyclocross showed. The crowds were entertained and the racing was brutal.

Like many amateurs and professionals this past weekend, former French National CX Champion Steve Chainel stopped by for a post-race cool-down on the Omnium Zero-Drive Trainer

 

Helen Wyman navigates the Challenge tent, sharing a nearly infinite amount of wisdom with up and comers Anna Kay, Clara Honsinger, and Sammi Runnels – and of course they use Feedback repair stands and Omnium Trainers every weekend.

 

The newly formed Easton/Giant CX Team runs the same program as most – Pro Elites, Sprint Stands and Omnium Trainers – the portability and reliability of our products is hard to beat, or so we’re told!

 

We love SRAM and Trek Factory Racing, and they love our repair stands and tools! Their entire events program, including neutral support, uses our Pro Elite and Sprint Repair Stands, plus our Team Edition tool kit!

 

See, told you so – SRAM love our repair stands and the Team Edition Tool Kit – they recognize quality of purpose-built, multi-function tools!

 

Sophie de Boer, a World Cup Dutch rider, loves to warm-up on the Omnium Zero-Drive Trainer too!

 

Nothing to see here, except beard. And the beard’s sweet, sweet Pro Elite Repair Stand

 

Maghalie Rochette, Specialized/Feedback Sports athlete makes her way through the course on her way to 5th place! Not that you’d be able to see it, but underneath that mud is the UCI World Cup Leader’s Jersey after her season opening win at Jingle Cross.

 

Katerina Nash – what can you say – 41yrs old and absolutely crushing it with the win – also a sponsored Feedback Sports athlete. And no, it’s not about age…but her experience was definitely a serious contributor to the World Cup win.

 

Maghalie Rochette landed a hard-fought 5th place. Her cool-down provides the space to rest the mind from the busy week spent in the UCI Leader’s Jersey.

 

Our dedication to racing provides the feedback we look for in all of our products. How does weather influence a trainer? How do our stands hold up to a full season, or five? How do mechanics use our tools in the heat of the moment? Do our tools hold up to the demands of techs that use them everyday, sometimes several times a day.

Thanks for looking – and we’ll see you at the races!

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The Feedback Sports Gift Guide

wreath

It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year.

It’s that time of year!! Everyone is busy playing reindeer games; slogging through the mud and snow, spraying each other with power-washers, picking grass out of chains, and the whirring of an Omnium Over-Drive fills the air like the Carol of the Bells, …wait. We got the holidays mixed up with the peak of Cyclocross season. Let’s try that again.  Ahem. THE HOLIDAYS are UPON US!!  And while our products have been listed in several amazing Holiday Bicycle Gift Guides*, we thought we’d put a little gift guide together of our own.  We asked several co-workers to share what their favorite Feedback Sports Product is and why.


The Feedback Sports Gift Guide

  1. Thomas McDaniel (Product Marketing Manager): “The Dual-Sided Pic. It’s one of those tools that forces you to look at your bike differently. When I put it in my hand I automatically want to slow down and pay close attention to how my bike is doing – in that way it’s one of the most important tools in my collection.” – This says a lot because Thomas’s “collection” is…robust.  
  2. Scott Knight (Western Sales Manager): “The Bottle Opener. Because it’s ridiculously over-built and awesome.”
  3. Jeff Nitta (Vice President): “The Velo Wall Post.  I like its simplicity for hanging bikes when prepping them for a ride.  I have one at the end of my garage so I can pump up the tires, lube the chain and check to make sure the bike is ready to go.  When I’m done with it I fold it up and it’s out of the way.”
  4. Sammy Rutherford (Eastern Sales Manager: “My Omnium Trainer!! Nothing keeps my legs in better cycling shape during the off-season.”
  5. Will Allen (Product Engineer): “My favorite FBS product is the one currently in development.  The products we currently have are all great, but what we’re working on for the future is even better.”  Wow. Well played, Will. 
  6. Mike Guinta (Product Engineer): “Eggnog.”  “Mike, we don’t make eggnog.”  “…Fine. Tools. I like the tools.”
  7. Lisa Hudson (Co-Owner/Accounting): “The Velo Hinge because it maximizes the storage space for my quiver of bikes!

And there you have it–straight from the folks at Feedback Sports.


We wish you a very merry Holiday Season.  We hope you enjoy the time with your family, friends annnnnnnnd, we also hope you get the chance to sneak out for a ride. It’s never too cold. Never.

*And finally, here’s that list of legitimate Gift Guides we mentioned earlier, plus a contest that would make someone’s holiday very Merry, indeed. 

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Want to be a better cyclocross racer? Avoid the avoidable, says coach Chris Mayhew.

man lying on ground with bike
With the upcoming United States Cyclocross National Championships , we invited JBV Coaching’s Chris Mayhew to share his thoughts on how to prepare for the big race at hand. Mayhew has actively raced for over 25 years – toeing the line at elite cyclocross, road, MTB and time trial events.  He puts on cycling training camps, cycling skills clinics, and rumor has it, he’s also quite the bike mechanic. In other words, Chris lives and dies for cyclocross and has the experience to know what makes a bike racer successful.  Anyone prepping for that “big race” has trained their body to be ready. Chris’s tips can ensure your bike is ready, too.
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You’ve spent months training and analyzing your data, hours researching the right hashtags and filters for your #crossiscoming posts and then on race day all that hard work comes undone from a preventable mechanical. Bummer.

Ben Bergeron says there are 5 things you can control as a racer: sleep, recovery, nutrition, training and mindset. I would add that for bike racing you can also control the initial state of your equipment. That said, I realize it’s challenging to put in the work as a bike racer and then have to be a bike mechanic too. My experience has proven there are two really easy ways to provide the best return on your time and keep your equipment in for cyclocross season.

First, wash your bike.

Bill Marshall (KCCX) getting the job done in fine fashion.

This can take many forms, and it’s somewhat situational dependent. After a muddy ride or race, the minimum you should do is lean the bike up against something and hit it with a hose to knock the majority of the mud off. This will keep your sidewalls and any metal parts on the bike happy along with the cables, if you still have any of those! Spend two minutes on this.

It doesn’t need to be perfect, it needs to be clean enough to lube a chain and see the details of the drivetrain components. The real action happens with a deeper wash, which should happen once a week. Remove the wheels, install a chain keeper, and put the bike in a repair stand. I prefer dropout-style repair stands for washing and detailed work, but also have the luxury of a standard upright repair stand too. Get a bucket, some brushes and some Dawn soap and go to town. This isn’t about being a black shoe, white sock roadie. Think of this as an active meditation with your bike. Clean all the surfaces, making sure some sort of cleaner (soap for the bike, de-greaser for the chain) gets liberally applied and washed off. As you do this, have a close look at the frame and all the moving, rotating and gliding components. Spin the cranks while you clean them and feel for looseness or crunchiness in the bearings (bottom bracket, pedal and derailleur). Think about any issues you had with the bike when you last rode it – the minute I dismount my bike, I seem to forget any problem I had until the next time I ride.

This whole bike wash process should take around 15-20 minutes from the time you fill the bucket until you put the bike back in storage. The main point in all of this is to engage with every part of the bike and catch things like bent chain links or worn cables before they become a problem on race day. This is a great time to quickly check your brake pads too.

So yes, you get a clean bike out of it, but more importantly it’s a bike inspection and preventative maintenance.

In tandem with the above, and maybe even while you still have it in the stand, check your bolts.

You don’t have to do this every week, but once a month run through the stem, seat-post and saddle bolts at minimum. I’m in love with my Feedback Sports Range for this sort of work. You can loosen and tighten any bolt with it (unlike most torque wrenches) and it comes in a very handy little case that keeps all the bits in one place. All my other torque bits are scattered somewhere across my work bench at this point. I’ve taken to just keeping my Range in my race clothing bag as a race day essential.

As I said earlier, bike maintenance is definitely something you can control – it’s called “preventative maintenance” for a reason, and it’s a great use of your time – I’ve witnessed too many races undone by the avoidable. And as with any task, the right tool makes it easier and faster to do, which means you’re more likely to do it.

Racing bikes is hard work, on and off the field. Don’t let all your hours of training and preparation come undone by one loose bolt. Spend some time owning the state of your equipment. Get it clean enough to notice any small issues before they become a race day nightmare. Run through the bolts periodically to make sure nothing is loose and don’t forget the bolts in your shoes. If you want to make all of the above easier  to perform there are some Feedback Sports items that would be worth putting on your wish-list.

Good luck at your races, and remember: you can often make your own luck.

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Thanks for the words of wisdom, Chris! Follow Chris on IG, Facebook and Twitter for more. You can also catch his articles on Cyclocross Magazine. 

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TLC for Your Bike Repair Stand

Your trusty wash and work stand has tirelessly held onto your bike(s) hundreds of times so you can freely use both hands to wash, fiddle, adjust, and dial in your favorite ride to keep it in tip top shape, but when is the last time you gave your stand a little love in return? The nice thing about our line of bike repair stands is that they don’t require much, but with a little bit of TLC and inspection of potentially worn parts, you can keep your stand functioning like the first day you laid eyes on each other.  If you’re into bike maintenance and keeping everything in tip-top shape–why not include your bike repair stand?  Read on to find out how to keep things wash and work  running smoothly, which leads to your bike running smoothly, which in turn leads to adorable canines and world peace.

Now that your stand is dirty from the grime that has come off of your bike from a good season of riding, here are a few helpful tips and tricks to get your stand dialed so you can focus on keeping your bike clean and happy.

Clean it up.

Feedback Sports repair stands are made from premium materials to stand up to the elements, so they aren’t afraid of a little soap and water. Some basic Dawn dish soap in a bucket of warm water will serve as a safe and friendly cleaning agent that’s both easy on the stand and your hands. A soft brush such as the one that you use for cleaning your bike is typically sufficient for removing grime around moving parts and will be easy on your stand’s finish.

(PRO tip: Instead of adding soap first then adding water to create the bubbles, reverse the process by adding soap to water and allowing it to dissolve for a moment. A shot of pressured water will agitate the solution and give you bubbles that will last exponentially longer and be more effective for cleaning).

Shake and dry.

After you give your stand a sudsy bath, grab onto the main center tubes and give the stand a good shake to get some water off of the surfaces. A drop motion followed by an abrupt stop is typically a good method for shaking some of the water off. Follow up with a soft and absorbent cloth over all of the main surfaces to remove any grime you may have missed in the washing phase. Letting your stand hang out in the warmth of the sun will allow all of the non-reachable places to dry out entirely.

(Sunglasses optional; however, your stand does appreciate stylish accessories to accentuate it’s already silky good looks).
Keep things moving freely.

Your repair stand has moving parts that like to stay moving freely. Keeping these moving parts lubricated periodically will protect them during repeated wash cycles and make your life easier when it comes time to setting your stand up or folding it back down.  Give a drop of chain lube to areas such as the barrel nut inside the QR levers or the cam interface of the QR to make the actuation smoother. Follow up with a rag to pick up any excess chain lube that may have dripped.

(Note: Don’t lubricate the main telescoping tube as it will not have sufficient grip for keeping your bike suspended in the spot you want it).
Take a closer look.

Once everything has been cleaned up, a good once over to see how your parts are wearing is a good idea. Pay attention to rubber foot plugs and clamp jaws as they typically see the most amount of wear on the stand. Having some spare parts in your toolbox is a nice way to minimize any downtime in case something does need to be replaced from wear. Replacement parts can be found at the following link: Work Stand Replacement Parts .

Enjoy a cold one.

Finally, don’t forget to grab a cold drink and use your stand’s bottle opener to access the delicious contents inside. Sit back, relax, and take a moment to marvel over your freshly cleaned ride and repair stand.

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Q&A with Slopestylist, DJ Brandt

Slopestyle rider DJ Brandt sits down for a Q&A with Feedback Sports
At only 23 years old, Colorado native, DJ Brandt has already ridden and raced all over the world.  His main discipline is Slopestyle (having loved it since day one) but he’s just as happy getting on the DH bike whether it be Freeride or race courses. He loves it all. DJ’s joy of riding seeps into a dare-devil skill-set most of us couldn’t dream of having.


In light of this, you can imagine how hard it could be to get him to slow down enough during racing season for an interview, but we did it!  Read our short and to the point Q&A below from DJ.


1. Give us a quick history of your riding/racing career. I started out BMX-ing at the skate park, tried a friend’s dirt jumper, then bought a dirt jumper. I rode my first Slopestyle event 6 months later and have been hooked on big air since!

2. What’s your favorite (or best) race? Colorado Freeride Festival.

3. What’s your least favorite (or worst) race? Fise Cheng du. For many reasons.

4. What’s the craziest trick you’ve pulled off? Double flip or something. (We feel this answer was down-played due to DJ’s natural affable, humble nature). 

5. What’s been the craziest race scenario you’ve ever witnessed? Racing through a city in the middle of Mexico with 50k fans screaming and cheering. You look around and think, “Who is here? It must be someone big. Then you realize they are all there to watch the race and cheer for you.”

Photo: Nicolas Switalski/Altius

6. Do you have any advice to a younger, less experienced rider? Do what you like if you want to be happy. Don’t do something just because you think other people want to see it.

7. What’s coming in 2017? This season will consist of more Slope events, DH races and Freeride events across the globe.

8. Finally, what’s your favorite Feedback Sports product?  The Scorpion stand is pretty sweet but then again, so is everything else they make.  (Aw, shucks. He made us blush.  Truth be told, Feedback Sports is happy to provide DJ with the products he needs to keep his bikes dialed.

*You can follow his gasp-inducing fun on social media: IG /@djshreda, Twitter /@djshreda, FB /@deejboyy .

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Summertime with Feedback Sports

landscape sunset photo

It’s SUMMER!!  We think we can count on warm temps and snow-free trails in Colorado (knock on wood). At least for the next 6-8 weeks.  And we’ll take it, because that means RIDING BIKES! We all know that when the temperatures of soar, so does the motivation to ride and race. Feedback Sports offers the perfect variety of products to help you get ready for everything Summer has to throw at you on the bike!

summertime boy on bike
Ahhhhh.  We love you, Summer.

You may be of the…hardier stock and have been riding your bike all winter long, or perhaps you’ve been hibernating.  Either way, our wash and work stands are the perfect addition to any cyclist’s workshop. We proudly support four World Tour cycling teams;  Tinkoff, Trek SegafredoLotto Soudal, and IAM Cycling.  When it comes to prepping the fastest teams in the world, the stand of choice in the pits happens to be our Sprint stand. It’s sturdy and fast (plus it folds up small–which helps save space in the team bus). Check out our full selection of stands and find the right one for you!

And speaking of race-prep… the Omnium has been winning over racers across every discipline of cycling (except perhaps E-bikes). This fork mount portable trainer means no more messing with the back wheel before a race.  It also offers internal progressive resistance (while still weighing under 14 pounds) and folds down small into it’s own tote-bag. From pro-triathletes (Gwen Jorgensen, Tyler Butterfield, Lauren Barnett, etc) to pro DH racers (Riding Addiction, Yeti/Fox) to our pro road friends at Drapac…the Omnium is taking the racing scene by storm.  Check it out and see what it can do for your training and racing this summer!

And last, but certainly not least: let’s talk about all the wonderful summertime cycling events.  What are your favorites?  Cruiser rides? Benefit rides? Bike to Work Day? Triathlons? MTB races? BMX? Well, guess what? We happen to love all of these!! Check out our event calendar and you might just see us and/or our gray tent in your neck of the woods…or out on the trails.
summer kick off collage Foothills

 

 

 

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Spring Bike Maintenance Made Easy

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Whether you’re a fair-weather rider who’s bike has been hibernating all winter, or a winter-riding die-hard, now is the time to inspect your bike and give it a little TLC.  Feedback Sports has some user-friendly tips to help!

bear hibernating   dino snowy bike

Start with a full-bike inspection. In order to do this, it’s obviously best if the bike is clean (insert groan here).  We know, we know.  Cleaning your bike is not always at the top of everyone’s list of fun ways to pass the time, but in the end, you and your bike will appreciate it!!  A clean bike is a happy bike. And happy bikes are fast, reliable bikes.

Follow the 5 steps below and you can’t go wrong.

  1.  Give your bike a nice bath.  Not sure how best to do this?  Check out this video from our friends at wearebutter.com.  
  2.  Remember, if you de-grease components, you must re-grease them.Not sure which type of lube is best or how to apply it?  Ask your local bike shop!  That’s what they are for–to help you help yourself. Don’t be embarrassed. There are no stupid questions if it’s the right type of shop.
  3.  While your bike is still clean, don’t forget to inspect your components for wear to prevent further damage. Tire tread, chain wear, worn cables, and brake pads all need to be checked/maintained. If you HAVE been sticking it out this winter, remember that snow, rain, road grit and de-icer are all things that expedite wear and tear on your bike and components.
  4.  If applicable, check your sealant! Most sealants have a time-period (climate dependent) that they will last in your tire. It may be time to add more.
  5.  If there’s an issue that comes up during this inspection and you don’t know how to fix it…(guess. C’mon, guess).  That’s RIGHT!!  ASK YOUR LOCAL BIKE SHOP!! They will be happy to help and might even offer maintenance clinics so you can feel more confident maintaining your bike in the future.

And that’s pretty much it. Follow those 5 steps and you too can be standing there, admiring your clean, fast, SAFE bike. You’ll show up to that next group ride guilt-free and all smug-like when you look around and see all those other filthy, sad bikes.  Feels good, right?  Sure it does.

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*Pro Tip #1:  If you have one of our wash and work stands, everything above is infinitely easier than say…leaning your bike against your car or a tree. Some might ask: “Why do I even need a work stand when I just ask my significant other or one of my kids to hold it for me?”  Answer: because this is a ridiculous use of that person’s time and in the end ruins the love of cycling for everyone. Don’t do it.  

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*Pro Tip #2: We also offer a FREE Bike Maintenance app to help you keep track of everything above.  It can be hard to remember when you last replaced a chain or refreshed your sealant.  Our app does this FOR you. IOS and Android-friendly!!

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