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Feedback Sports Goes World Cup

Feedback Sports has signed on as Co-Title Sponsor to form the 2019-20 Specialized/Feedback Sports Cyclocross Team. The team consists of seasoned professional cyclocross racer Maghalie Rochette, and her mechanic and coach David Gagnon.

“Feedback Sports products are designed to simplify cycling and are a reflection of our internal passions as racers and mechanics. Maghalie and David are true professionals and offer the level of scrutiny of our products we ask from our sponsored partners”, said Doug Hudson, Owner of Feedback Sports. “They mirror our passion for racing, balanced with a deep love of cycling and an infectious positive attitude. We are delighted to have Maghalie and David representing Feedback Sports in our first title sponsorship of a World Cup cyclocross program. It’s long been a dream of mine to have our logo on a World Cup Cyclocross jersey, and after 15 years, this is the right time and Maghalie and David are the right people. ”

Maghalie got her start professionally in 2014 with the LUNA Pro Team (now Clif Pro Team), primarily racing XCO mountain bike with an abbreviated cyclocross program. 2018 marked the beginning of CX Fever, her privateer campaign to target her truest passion of World Cup Cyclocross. During the 2018/2019 season Maghalie accomplished impressive North American results – making several podiums at key UCI events and taking home the Canadian National Title. While those results alone are a success for some, Rochette also captured her first Pan-American Championship.

Aside from her athletic achievements she’s a wonderful advocate for the sport, passionate wood worker, and cheese lover.

Maghalie commented “When we decided to build this team, David and I wrote down a list of the companies we dreamed to partner with. For us, the best partners are people that we like and that we want to work and spend time with. The best partners are also the ones who make the products we believe in. Feedback Sports fit exactly that profile. The whole team is passionate about cycling, and passionate about making quality products…they want to be the best at what they do and have fun while doing it, which is the same philosophy David and I have towards our racing endeavors. For us, there is a lot to learn from the way they run their company, and that’s inspiring. ”

She added,”We are extremely proud to have Feedback Sports as a co-title sponsor this year. I’m excited to be representing them in the races I’ll be doing. I like the company and I’m seriously proud to have their logos on my kit. Plus, I know that everyone in the company will be watching the races, because that’s how passionate they are about the sport, and to me, that’s super motivating. I have no doubt this will be a fun year working with them! Feedback Sports really has the CX Fever!”

David Gagnon, Maghalie’s partner, mechanic, and coach is a large part of the team. Although we don’t get to see the work put in behind the racing scenes, David makes the same commitment throughout the season as Maghalie. He also has plenty of racing experience himself, formerly racing on the ITU triathlon circuit. He also has deep understanding of physiology, working as Head Coach and Co-Owner of the performance center PowerWatts Nord in Quebec, Canada. Beyond sport, David is also a food lover and is at home in the kitchen or over the grill.
David is excited to be part of the Feedback Sports team, stating “Feedback Sports is an example that it is possible to blend perfectly business, life, family and sport together. Their strong presence and support of the racing scene in the past decade shows how passionate they are about racing and for these reasons, we couldn’t be more proud to be associated with such a great company.”

“When people watch bike races, they see the bike and the rider. But when you look at everything that goes behind the race itself, you quickly realize that there is a lot more going on. Travelling to races, preparing the bikes, warming-up and cooling down from the race and storing your bikes back at home – Feedback Sports products are an essential part of what we need to make this team happen.”

“For us this year, Feedback Sports products are the unsung heroes and we’re incredibly excited to bring them to the front row with us.”

To learn more about Maghalie’s plans for the upcoming season, check out this Cyclocross Magazine interview. And because #crossiscoming, check out David’s top tips for gluing tubulars and see what Maghalie thinks about trainers vs rollers. 

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Q&A with Pro Mechanic, Doug Sumi – Team Holowesko|Citadel

With the 2018 Amgen Tour of California now underway, we thought we’d check in with one of our favorite supported teams racing it– Team Holowesko|Citadel.  Read the Q&A below with head mechanic, Doug Sumi (one of the most entertaining pro-mechanics we know) to find out what a day in the life is like for a mechanic at an event like the TOC, what super-secret skill every mechanic needs and what Feedback Sports product is practically glued to Doug’s side at every race.

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FBS: Tell us a little bit about yourself, Doug. 
Doug: Doug Sumi/ Seattle, Washington. I enjoy Imperial stouts and light roast coffees, though typically not in that order.

FBS: What led you to being a professional bike mechanic for Team Holowesko|Citadel
Doug: A friend of mine needed helping running a crit pit in front of the bike shop I used to work at in Seattle (Recycled Cycles). Since I had never worked in that situation before I was mainly in charge of pumping bike tires and setting up tents. After a pretty big crash I got handed a bike with a very bent derailleur hanger and my friend said I had 15 seconds to fix it our that racer was out. 15 seconds later I was pushing him back into the race with a bike that mostly shifted. After that I was hooked. I worked a lot of local events around Seattle to get started and since then have spent time with Hagens-Berman, Jamis, Raleigh-Clement, and Kona Factory CX and am just starting my 4th season with Holowesko-Citadel.

FBS: Explain a day-in the life of a pro road mechanic.
Doug: I like, sometimes to the frustration of my roommate, to be up an hour before any work has to start. I spend the first hour of the day drinking coffee, reading something that has nothing to do with bike racing and hopefully breathing slowly. After that we start the day in earnest. Bikes come out of the trailer and get aired up, spares of everything checked and loaded into the car(s). Breakfast generally happens right before or right after this depending on our setup. Then we head to the start. Mechanics float around a little bit and chat with the riders. Good riders always check out their bikes before they roll to the start. No one is perfect and typically if we’ve done our job well there won’t be any issues but we are always around to make sure everything is as good as it can be. Some guys just double check their wheel skewers are tight and brake calipers are centered, others take out a tape measure and double check saddle height or saddle fore and aft.

Once the race has started you’re hopefully in for a nice relaxing afternoon trying not to stay awake in the back seat of the team car. For us, the more boring the better. Any busy day for mechanics is not a good day for your riders. And in the end they are the ones that matter, otherwise all the TV coverage would be of us trying not to fall asleep. If there is a mechanical, flat tire, crash, any of those things we do our best to remedy any issues quickly and get the rider back in the race. With spare bikes on the roof and spare wheels in the car we usually can remedy any equipment issues pretty quickly. After the finish it’s back to the trailer. Every race bike gets washed, dried and gone over to make sure it’s 100% for the next day. We may also change out gearing or wheels depending on what the next stage looks like. Part of the reason we wash bikes every day is it makes it much easier to spot small issues before they affect the race. Small pieces of glass in tires or lightly bent links in chains are much easier to see on a very clean bike. It may seem like overkill from the outside but it’s very critical to what we do. If there were flats or crashes we replace parts or glue fresh tires. Then the cars get washed, trailer is packed and locked, and hopefully we have time for some dinner and a beer.

FBS: What’s a super-secret skill you are really happy you have as a mechanic?
Doug: I can eat really fast (apparently a genetic talent) and can sleep almost anywhere that isn’t an airplane. When you have really busy days, sometimes it’s nice to be able to knock out dinner in 5 minutes and get a good amount of sleep in a bed you’ve never slept in before.

FBS: Any crazy stories about pulling off the impossible before or during a race?
Doug: I was in the car last year at Tour of Utah when Robin Carpenter crashed and broke his helmet. Typically there is a spare helmet in the car but someone had pulled it out before the stage. For very good reasons riders are required to replace broken helmets before they can continue racing and we were standing with Robin who was literally seconds away from dropping out of the race. As we were trying to find a solution a man on the side of the street offered to walk to his house a couple blocks away and lend Robin his personal helmet. A couple minutes later Robin, rocking a early 90’s era Specialized helmet, was chasing back on to the peloton. He ended up getting 4th I think on that stage. That gentlemen also has a Holowesko-Citadel Giro helmet at his house now.

FBS: If time travel were a thing: who would win a sprint finish between Sean Kelly and Freddy Maertens?
Doug: I’m going to go with Sean Kelly here, but if time travel were a thing I would go back and tell my former self to watch many more classic cycling highlight reels. Then I would feel like I was more informed to make such decisions.

FBS: What’s your favorite Feedback Sports product and why?
Doug: I love my Sprint Bike Repair Stand. It’s a solid and firm way to hold any bike that I work on and the spinning action makes for faster/easier bike washing and fixing. When you can stand in one spot close to your tools and move the bike instead of your body everything is closer at hand and much more efficient. Plus I can carry it on to an airplane or easily fit it in my checked luggage. Road races in California or cross world cups in Belgium you won’t see me without one.

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*The team last raced in the Amgen Tour of California in 2015, when Tom Skujins came out of the shadows to win Stage 3, setting the trajectory for his professional career.

This year, Holowesko|Citadel brings seven of its strongest riders to the the tour: John Murphy, TJ Eisenhart, Brendan Rhim, Andrei Krasilnikau, Fabian Lienhard, Ruben Companioni, and Miguel Bryon. Lienhard proved his clout while racing in Europe, earning a win during the first stage of the Tour of Normandie, as well as placing a close fourth in Stage 6 of Tour of Croatia. Murphy has always been a strong sprinter for the team, taking the first stage of Circuit des Ardennes this season, as well as back-to-back wins at the Athens Twilight Criterium and multiple wins at this year’s Tour of Southern Highlands.

“We’re excited to be back at Amgen Tour of California this year,” says Rich Hincapie, manager for the team. “With the team being in Europe this time around, the riders have had much experience and preparation. This year, we have a mix of climbers, sprinters, and all-rounders, so I feel good about our chances for a stage win.”

Chief sports director Thomas Craven has high hopes as well, particularly for rider TJ Eisenhart. “TJ has been looking forward to this race and the competition. I am banking that he brings the sunshine to Santa Barbara and the Gibraltar climb.”

You can follow the team’s adventures on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter

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Race-Day Warm-up with Amanda Nauman

Though we all know that warm-legs are fast legs… it’s can be hard to know where to begin. You might wonder, “Should I use a bike trainer or rollers?” How hard should I go before a race?”, “For how long?”, “Should I do intervals?”, “Why is my skinsuit so tight?”, “Is my number pinned properly?”.  While we can’t really help you with the last two questions, we did find some experts to share what works for them in terms of the first four.

We asked our friends, David Sheek (Carmichael Training Systems Coach) and Amanda Nauman (known to friends and the cycling community as “Amanda Panda”) of Team SDG – Muscle Monster for some general preparation tips and a warm-up plan to help anyone maximize their race-day potential.

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~From Amanda and Dave~

Our friends at Feedback Sports have really stepped up the game with a solid range of traveling goodies that are also amazing products to have in any garage. Whether traveling to Europe or chasing events around the United States, Feedback has made it easier to be prepared at home and on the road. A few of our favorites are the Team Edition Tool Kit, Omnium Portable Trainer, and Sprint Work Stand which all fit into the bottom of our cases for travel.

Being Prepared: Pre-Event Warm-up

A pre-event warm-up is designed to increase muscle core temperature, start the body’s cooling processes, and activate energy systems. Here’s a step-by-step guide to activating your body for a great performance using the Feedback Sports Omnium Portable Trainer.

Warm-up

It’s pretty common for a warm-up routine to be 45-60 minutes. You need to spend some time at lactate threshold and throw in a few high-intensity efforts to activate the processes related to producing and processing lactate, but you want to do as little as possible to achieve those goals. A generic warm-up includes 15-25 minutes of spinning, 5-10 minutes at LT, and two 1-2 minute VO2 max efforts. Variations of that will typically get the job done. A long warm-up is likely to generate more heat so weather and other variables are taken into consideration.

The nature of your event also plays a role in your warm-up. If your event is going to start out relatively slow, like a road race, then you can minimize the warm-up activities. If the event is going to start hard, like a cyclocross race, then it’s important to activate your energy systems and lactate processing systems.

Variations on the Weather

There is a fine line between activating your body for a great performance and hurting your performance through overheating in your warm-up. After warming up some higher energy systems, your muscle temperature and core temperature are elevated and primed to race. In warmer temperatures it is recommended to cool down for about 10 minutes before going to the start line to avoid any chances of overheating. In cooler temperatures it is recommended to add clothing layers and maintain that elevated core temperature en route to the start line.

Go to the Start Line

If you’re going to be standing on the start line for a long time before you start, as is often the case with cyclocross races, you’re going to be standing still. In this scenario, try to go to the line wearing enough clothing or layers to stay warm. Plan to hand your clothing off to someone with a few minutes to the whistle.

The focus on staying warm during and after a riders’ warm-up routine pays off because you will be ready for action right from the start. Keeping your core temperature at an optimal level enables you to start faster, get to the front of the race, and stay there.

Taking the proper steps to activate all your energy systems through a proper warm-up, all starts with the right trainer routine. It’s difficult to find an event that allows for sufficient open road to correctly hit the warm-up zones that your preparation requires. Traveling with the Feedback Sports Omnium Over-Drive guarantees the freedom to create and execute a routine around an ideal warm-up that will set you up physically and mentally for success.

Time CTS Zone Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) 10-Point Scale
10 min Endurance Miles (EM) 4-5
2 min Tempo 6
2 min EM 4-5
2 min Tempo 6
2 min EM 4-5
2 min Steady State (SS) 7-8
2 min EM 4-5
2 min SS 7-8
2 min EM 4-5
1 min Climbing Repeat (CR) 8
2 min EM 4-5
30 sec Power Interval (PI) 9
2 min EM 4-5
30 sec PI 9
5-10min EM 4-5
Off Trainer – Head to Startline
10 min Active Cooling 2-4

*Amanda is currently rocking the cyclocross and gravel scene. She and David clearly know a thing or two about race-day preparation. Thanks for the tips, David and Amanda!  We’ll see you (and your Feedback Sports Race Day Essentials) at the Cyclocross Nationals in Kentucky! #pandapower

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CX Fever #1 – Gluing Tubulars

Maghalie Rochette – CX Fever Racing p/b Specialized

We’re thrilled to announce our support for an athlete we’ve already been working with for a few years–Maghalie Rochette. Maghalie is amicably leaving the CLIF Pro Team to start her own cyclocross program. Why? She’s got the fever. The fever for cyclocross. 

She’ll be racing cyclocross in North America until November then Europe for 3 months to finish the season strong. Maghalie’s partner David will be the mechanic. Or as she puts it, “The mechanic and the ‘doer of everything’, like he always does… I’ll do my best to help him. At the races, you will be able to find David and I under a Specialized tent that we will be sharing with the TSH/Specialized Team crew.”

You’ll see the tent decked out with Feedback Sports products. Feel free to ask Maghalie and David about them. Get your hands on the tools. Check out our trainers and rollers. They are happy to give you the low-down on what makes our products part of their “Race Day Essentials” as well as some pro-tips on bike racing and wrenching!

And speaking of…check out David’s tried and true 8 step method of gluing tubulars. 

Gluing tubulars

Every year, it’s a long process we have to start over. Here is the step by step method that David uses to ensure our tubulars are always properly glued.

  1. Pump the tubular. Apply a layer of glue on the tubular and a layer on the rim of the wheel. Hang and let dry for 24h.
  2. The next day, apply another layer of glue on the rim. Let dry a few hours.
  3. Put some double sided glue tape on the rim. Remove the paper from the tape.
  4. Apply a second layer of glue on the tubular tire and a layer of glue over the tape.
  5. Right away, deflate the tubular. Verify the direction of the thread and carefully install the tubular on the wheel.
  6. Pump the tire and adjust the position of the tire on the wheel to make sure it is straight.
  7. Let dry for at least 24h before using.
  8. You are ready to shred!!!

**Pro tip: A few days before you start this process, it helps to stretch the tubular. You can either set it on a dry wheel for a few days, or simply stretch it with your hand.

Maghalie is in good hands with some other stellar companies.  SpecializedCLIF BarRovalSRAMTenSpeed HeroOakleyChallenge TiresGiro Cyclingand Horst Engineering are supporting Maghalie, too. We’re all going to be working together throughout the season to spread the CX Fever!

You can check out her preliminary schedule for the 2018/19 season here. Go get em’, Maghalie!

Without Limits Colorado Triathlon

Swim, Bike, Run and even Aquabike at this Year’s Edition of the Colorado Triathlon Presented by Without Limits Productions.

 The Colorado Triathlon is put on by Without Limits Productions which was founded in 2007 with a simple goal in mind: to produce the type of events that our Without Limits Crew desires for themselves. Affordability and a laid back atmosphere for beginners to elites is the core of each and every production.  When signing up for an event, Without Limits assures that every detail is taken care of. All you need to do is focus on getting to the finish line with a smile.

Some athletes are trying to reach their first finish line, some are trying a new sport out like XTERRA or cyclocross, and some are racing for the podium and new personal record, whichever category you fall into, we have a race to suit your needs.

Colorado Triathlon

Where Colorado comes to race on June 2nd, 2018! The Colorado Triathlon – sprint & olympic distances, (NEW Duathlon & Aquabike options). To make this the can’t miss event of the season, we’ll also have: amazing food provided by Noodles & Co., Ska Brewing Beer Garden, athlete full zip sweat shirts, and the best swag bag of the season.

Feedback Sports will be there showing off our great Race Day Essentials, so stop by our tent say hello!

For more great events from the Without Limits team, check out their website. Stay up to date with the latest from Without Limits by connecting with them on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Sea Otter Classic

Who

Sea Otters…….just kidding, us, Feedback Sports, along with thousands of spectators, athletes, exhibitors, and bicycle enthusiasts of all kinds!

What

“You guys should put on a mountain bike race.”

That simple statement from a Monterey bike shop owner in 1990 was the genesis for the Sea Otter Classic.

Co-founders Frank Yohannan and Lou Rudolph hosted the inaugural Laguna Seca Challenge on April 6 & 7, 1991. There was a total of 350 athletes and 150 spectators. Today the event hosts over 9,600 athletes and 72,500 fans. In 1993 the event was renamed the Sea Otter Classic and is now universally regarded as the world’s premier cycling festival.

Known as a sprawling and energetic “celebration of cycling,” Sea Otter is cycling’s North American season opener. Professional and amateur athletes alike make the annual pilgrimage to Sea Otter to participate in some of the sport’s most competitive and enduring events. Hundreds of pro cyclists, including national, world, and Olympic champions, attend Sea Otter to race and meet with fans.

Most of cycling’s racing disciplines are represented including mountain bike cross country, downhill, dual slalom, and short track racing. Road cyclists compete in circuit, criterium, and road racing. Also offered are cyclocross and a number of non-competitive recreational events for riders of all ages.

The Sea Otter Classic also hosts the world’s largest consumer bike exposition in North America. The Expo holds hundreds of vendors who display new products, distribute free samples, and offer great bargains. The four-day, action-packed festival includes an international food court, entertainment, bike demos, stunt shows, and activities for children.

The Sea Otter Classic is located in Monterey County, one of the most popular tourist destinations in the world.

When

April 19-22

Where

Monterey, California

Why

To celebrate the wonderful things that are cycling. This will be Feedback Sports’ 8th visit to the exciting celebration of cycling that is the Sea Otter Classic. So swing by booth 112/113 and check out our race day essentials, trainers, tools, storage solutionsrepair stands, as well as our store displays. We’ll also have some new apparel on display only for Sea Otter so get there while the getting is good.

 

For a complete schedule of events click here.

For more information on events, exhibit, cost, etc click here.

 

Reno 2018 Cyclocross Nationals

The 2018 Reno Cyclocross National Championships are almost here!  Will we see you there? We certainly hope so.  For the gazillionth year in a row, Feedback Sports will be racing, wrenching, pitting and cheering our faces off at Cyclocross Nationals. We’ll have 2 – 10×10 tents, plenty of Omniums to warm-up on, tools to play with and some of our new shirts/hats for sale. We’re calling it “The Official Unofficial Warm-up Tent”. 

Well also be at the Women’s Night and The Mechanic’s Challenge. If you’re going, please come and introduce yourself! We love making new friends. New friends who love bikes is even better.

Click here for the full racing schedule.

Seriously.  Don’t stand out there in the cold.  Come say “hello!”.

No. Just…no.